"Common Kitchen layouts"
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<div class="container"> <ul class="nav nav-tabs" id="myTab"> <li class="active"><a href="#o">One Wall (Pullman style)</a></li> <li><a href="#p">Parallel walls (Galley style)</a></li> <li><a href="#l">L Shape</a></li> <li><a href="#u">U Shape</a></li> <li><a href="#g">G Shape</a></li> </ul> <div class="tab-content"> <div class="tab-pane active" id="o">One-wall. Originally called the "Pullman kitchen," the one-wall kitchen layout is generally found in studio or loft spaces because it’s the ultimate space saver. Cabinets and appliances are fixed on a single wall. Most modern designs also include an island, which evolves the space into a sort of Galley style with a walk-through corridor. Download a sample floorplan.</div> <div class="tab-pane" id="p">Galley. This efficient, “lean” layout is ideal for smaller spaces and one-cook kitchens. The galley kitchen, also called a walk-through kitchen, is characterized by two walls opposite of each other—or two parallel countertops with a walkway in between them. Galleys make the best use of every square inch of space, and there are no troublesome corner cabinets to configure, which can add to a cabinetry budget. Download a sample floorplan.</div> <div class="tab-pane" id="l">L-Shape. An L-shaped kitchen solves the problem of maximizing corner space, and it’s a smart design for small and medium sized kitchens. The versatile L-shaped kitchen consists of countertops on two adjoining walls that are perpendicular, forming an L. The “legs” of the L can be as long as you want, though keeping them less than 12 to 15 feet will allow you to efficiently use the space.With an L-shaped layout, you’ll eliminate traffic: The kitchen will not become a thoroughfare because it’s just not logistically possible. Plus, you can easily add a dining space and multiple work zones to this layout. However, avoid this layout if your kitchen is large and can support other configurations, such as adding an island, or if multiple cooks will be using the space. Download a sample floorplan.</div> <div class="tab-pane" id="u">Like the one-wall and galley floor plans, a U-shaped layout is an efficient kitchen designed for one primary cook. Basically a wide galley kitchen with one end closed off, it keeps onlookers out of the main work area while remaining open to other rooms of the home and allowing traffic to pass.Problems with the traditional U-shaped kitchen typically arise due to its small size. For one, it doesn't offer room for a kitchen table and chairs. Secondly, depending on where the sink is situated, it may be impossible to fit the dishwasher right next to it. To address the seating issue, you can try, as shown here, a pass-through to the dining room on one of the "legs" of the U. Another option is to turn that leg into a peninsula by eliminating the wall and the upper cabinets. The peninsula counter can then be used for eating, homework or paying bills. Of course, that method also eliminates a significant amount of storage space. Moving the refrigerator out of the main U shape can give you more food and cookware storage near the rangetop and ovens. Adding a kitchen island may seem like the obvious choice, but be careful: Most older U-shaped kitchens don't have room for one. Industry guidelines recommend at least 3½ feet between the island and surrounding cabinets and appliances so that doors can open properly and people can maneuver safely.</div> <div class="tab-pane" id="g">The G-shaped kitchen layout is essentially a pumped-up version of the U-shaped layout. It's best suited to those who want to pack every square inch of kitchen possible into their space but don't have room for the clearance required around an island. Instead, a fourth leg is attached to one side of the U at a right or obtuse angle. Typically this fourth leg is a peninsula, because having a wall and upper cabinets would nearly close off the kitchen from the rest of the home. Make sure the peninsula is not so long that getting in and out of the kitchen becomes difficult. Essentially this area is a work aisle, not a walkway, so a width of 4 feet would be ideal. At the same time, don't make the peninsula so short that it can't offer enough room to seat a few guests or contain an appliance—or both, like the cooktop and breakfast bar shown here. This fourth leg is what makes the G-shaped layout—unlike the U-shaped layout—workable for multiple cooks.</div> </div> </div>
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